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avagee
03-06-2019, 10:52 PM
Anyone have any insight on the program and on the IQ portion of the test?

Mechanist
03-19-2019, 06:35 PM
The I.Q test is a one on one 90 minute quiz on memory, puzzle-solving, and mathematics. You will have to memorize a sequence of numbers and say it backwards, and find which numbers fit into a certain pattern. You will also receive 4 cubes, each face with 2 colors with a diagonal line through them; white and orange on each side of this line. With these you need to make certain patterns, each one harder than the next.

Some tips:

Seem engaged and be friendly to your proctor
Don't get mad if you run out of time on a problem
Dress in nice clothes (make a good first impression)
Take practice I.Q tests beforehand so you know the feeling of what it's like

That's all I should say.

Good luck!

avagee
03-25-2019, 09:02 PM
Mechanist, thank you for the helpful information. Do you have experience with your child, or did you go through the Prep for Prep process yourself? My child went for the interview today, which is the final part of the screening process. Now all we can do is wait. It's nerve wracking!


Do you have any insight about the actual 14 month program?

Mechanist
03-26-2019, 01:27 PM
My child is in the program. If your child gets in, my only advice is to persevere. It will be difficult for sure and the attrition rate was roughly 20% even deep into the program. In some cases the child was asked to leave and in other cases the child dropped out on his own.

Its a big ask for a child to go to school 9-5 all summer and then do 3 hours of homework every night. It takes a certain type of personality not necessarily smarts.

My big takeaway from this was the kids that are successful are the ones best with time management (which they stress and teach but not all kids take to it).
The ones that tend to drop out are the kids with many 'unprepared'. Starting today, write in a daily planner to get 'prepped'.

Good luck, hope you child makes it. In the end it is worth it especially if your child is happy and thrives. They have to want it.

Stuy2013
04-01-2019, 11:45 AM
It is interesting to know the attrition rate is that high. Something I can not image given 3 levels screening and IQ test included.

Jervis
04-01-2019, 01:09 PM
What if the attrition isn't because the kids aren't up to the challenge, but because it is an insane and dehumanizing process they are being put through to prove they are worthy of going to high school with white wealthy children? ;)

I don't know, many Asian kids go through the same thing to get into Specialized High Schools. I wish that we could just acknowledge that many people don't think the Prep for Prep schools or the Specialized High Schools are worth the human cost. This is a problem with all of the rhetoric around the idea that these are the best schools and that the admissions process is racist. If some people want to kill themselves to go to them that's their thing and their choice. It's not mine and I don't buy into the idea that these places are worth it.

QueensMom
04-01-2019, 03:46 PM
The I.Q test is a one on one 90 minute quiz on memory, puzzle-solving, and mathematics. You will have to memorize a sequence of numbers and say it backwards, and find which numbers fit into a certain pattern. You will also receive 4 cubes, each face with 2 colors with a diagonal line through them; white and orange on each side of this line. With these you need to make certain patterns, each one harder than the next.

Some tips:

Seem engaged and be friendly to your proctor
Don't get mad if you run out of time on a problem
Dress in nice clothes (make a good first impression)
Take practice I.Q tests beforehand so you know the feeling of what it's like

That's all I should say.

Good luck!

Does this test and interview happens when child is in 5th or 6th grade ? Are there any specific books to prep for "prep for prep" ! ( Sorry complete noobie to this ..haven't started my research)

Mechanist
04-01-2019, 05:08 PM
I don't think any test prep material can prepare you for it. It's done around this time of year during the 5th grade.

"Does this test and interview happens when child is in 5th or 6th grade ? Are there any specific books to prep for "prep for prep" ! ( Sorry complete noobie to this ..haven't started my research)"

Mechanist
04-01-2019, 05:18 PM
What if the attrition isn't because the kids aren't up to the challenge, but because it is an insane and dehumanizing process they are being put through to prove they are worthy of going to high school with white wealthy children? ;)

It's like asking an adult to have two full time jobs and excel at both of them. Some people will never want to do it and others will, it depends on the person and the perceived reward. Every child will want to quit, multiple times. That's why they have alumni come back and speak to the parents and their kids about their own experiences. Ultimately if you don't want it you will drop out or be asked to leave due to performance. You just can't keep up with the pace and workload if your desire isn't there, the program weeds those out. I mentioned it before but it doesn't necessarily reward the MOST intelligent. You have to have a unique set of attributes to go this long and hard. The program and alumni often stress, when the kids are placed in their day schools, they will be at the top of their class. The work was so intense when they go into 7th grade at Chapin or Dalton...wherever - it will seem easy. Believe it.

Obviously, the program does this so their kids don't lag behind. Alumni have come back and said Yale was easy compared to P4P.

Mechanist
04-01-2019, 05:27 PM
It is interesting to know the attrition rate is that high. Something I can not image given 3 levels screening and IQ test included.

You know how you think you want to work for a certain company? You research them, send them your resume, and you go through the 3 to 5 interview process, they do a background check on you, and you negotiate a salary that you're happy with - then you discover you don't want to be there?

The company spent thousands of dollars on a headhunter and many man hours picking you out thinking you were the right person but I don't think any of us will really know until we're thick in the middle of it.

GregsTutoringNYC
04-01-2019, 09:34 PM
I don't know, many Asian kids go through the same thing to get into Specialized High Schools. I wish that we could just acknowledge that many people don't think the Prep for Prep schools or the Specialized High Schools are worth the human cost. This is a problem with all of the rhetoric around the idea that these are the best schools and that the admissions process is racist. If some people want to kill themselves to go to them that's their thing and their choice. It's not mine and I don't buy into the idea that these places are worth it.

It's not for everybody. I went to a SHS. There was no human cost. I'd do it again in a heartbeat. I loved it. I can't imagine my life without having done so. The problem is when there is a mismatch. Another problem is disoriented and overzealous parents especially when they don't involve their child in the choice. That's the good aspect of the vetting process which IMO should be even stronger.


Does this test and interview happens when child is in 5th or 6th grade ? Are there any specific books to prep for "prep for prep" ! ( Sorry complete noobie to this ..haven't started my research)

Yes, 5th grader applicants can enter 7th grade and 6th graders can enter 8th grade after a 14 month prep course.

There is no prep for prep prep books that I'm aware of. Generally the child should be in the 90% percentile and above+ across the board. The point of the prep in all these programs is to be prepared, so it's not just smarts, but being able to keep up. Generally you'll know as the child will already be accelerated naturally, express such interests on their own accord, etc. but also have certain coursework already under their belts.

Stuy2013
04-03-2019, 05:46 AM
The I.Q test is a one on one 90 minute quiz on memory, puzzle-solving, and mathematics. You will have to memorize a sequence of numbers and say it backwards, and find which numbers fit into a certain pattern. You will also receive 4 cubes, each face with 2 colors with a diagonal line through them; white and orange on each side of this line. With these you need to make certain patterns, each one harder than the next.


What is the minimum IQ score to be admitted to the Prep (per your estimate)? What does it mean if a child went thru 180 minute quiz?

GregsTutoringNYC
04-03-2019, 07:06 AM
The first level vetting process is basically where you are in the 90th+ percentile. The exam and your provided report card scores is the second level vetting process. If you meet their cutoff formula you get to the next level which is to consider that along with your needs and your diversity background. Then you get an interview and IQ test. It's in the child's best interest to be familiar with an IQ test but not necessarily study for one. IIRC don't think they release that number.

Mechanist
04-03-2019, 07:59 AM
What is the minimum IQ score to be admitted to the Prep (per your estimate)? What does it mean if a child went thru 180 minute quiz?

I don't think the score is something they share with you, personally I don't take too much stock on the IQ score. Your child will sit with an adviser who administers the test and picks your child's brain. It's not done in a group setting.

avagee
04-04-2019, 08:58 PM
Thanks for the feedback. I'm surprised that there isn't more on this board being posted about Prep for Prep.


I am somewhat familiar with the program since my sister participated in it a very long time ago for Contingent III! As you mentioned, she also remembers it being very intense, but acknowledges to this day that the 14-months was so worth it and gave her opportunities that she would not have otherwise been able to have.


How well has your child been able to juggle the Wednesday/Saturday classes and workload during the school year?

acollado815
04-18-2019, 05:54 AM
I am a Prep for Prep Alum, my best man was one also, and my wife is too. It was single handedly the greatest and most challenging thing I ever did for my life. It is very true that they go overboard with the preparation but that is to make everything after much easier. Prep is also a massive family and support network that will be with you the rest of your life, and are always there when you need them, whenever in your life that may be. Ask me any question...

avagee
04-23-2019, 05:34 PM
Thanks for your feedback. Was there any part of the program that you regretted? Did you feel like you missed out on any part of your childhood while going through the rigorous 14 month program? Lastly, are they as strict as they say with regards to the attendance policy?

acollado815
04-24-2019, 10:06 AM
Was there any part of the program that you regretted?
- No, not really. Once you get over the fact that is A LOT of work, it was one of the most positive experiences I have ever had. To be surrounded by other students of color who all think on your wave length, and get deeply interested on topics that may not interest most people, was unbelievably supportive. How often have you seen a group of 12 year old kids eating McDonalds fries (when they were still good) on the way home, on the train, arguing over themes in Great Expectations or comparing Chaucer to hip hop. The work is difficult but they give you A LOT of support.

Did you feel like you missed out on any part of your childhood while going through the rigorous 14 month program?
- This is difficult to answer, for me, because I didnt really do much outside of school to begin with. My parents were far from wealthy. We did not eat out. We did not visit amusement parks outside of the rare trip to Coney Island. I was not in any summer camp or even a sport team growing up because we just didnt have the money. It was basically playing out in the street in front of the house, or reading books from the library. Prep actually challenged me and kept me firing on all cylinders. It saved me from boredom. I still got to play with the kids from the hood. I still went to the library. But now I also had a bunch of fascinating information to keep me busy. Instead of sitting in front of a TV or playing catch outside, I was studying. I wasn't in love with everything I was studying but I understood why I was doing it. There were times I had to say no to this or that because I had to read x amount of pages for class or what not, but those moments were never frequent enough that I can say I even remember them. Now I had a great childhood, parents who loved me, and did the best they could with what they had. Those 14 months added to it being a great childood, it didnt take anything away. Many of the friends I made in my contingent are still my very close friends to this day ( i dont mean like 2 or 3, I mean like dozens), and there is something to say about a group of kids that all went through the same 14 month process and stayed in contact all through adulthood. Prep is a massive family. I sometimes kid that we are a secret society of highly trained and accomplished minorities ready to take over the world, but there is truth in jest. Let me make something clear though, its not all work. We have fun. There are field trips, down time, time to just bond with your fellow classmates. Though the work is hard, it is not militaristic. What they say is true, Prep prepares you heavily. Private school was effectively a joke, we went in there with more tools than batman and the support of the justice league. Mind you, I was no where near the best student in the program and I still felt like that.


Lastly, are they as strict as they say with regards to the attendance policy?
- They are strict, but its is because we move fast, very fast. So missing too many days will but you signifigantly behind. Where as a regular school will read like 1 or 2 books a semester, we are reading like 6-8 in two months. Books above our grade level.


please ask me anything else you would like to know.

GregsTutoringNYC
04-24-2019, 06:26 PM
Although I did not do Prep for Prep, some of my own experiences are similar to yours and ones I very much cherish. Therefore, I am reading your response with a smile on my face. Kudos sir, kudos. :)

avagee
05-05-2019, 08:05 PM
Thank you!

If you don’t mind me asking, which independent school did you attend? I know that Prep offers resources to students to help transition into the new environment of the independent schools, but were the teachers and students at those schools welcoming to Prep students? I am just curious as the students at these private schools are obviously more priveleged so wanted to see if the adjustment was challenging.

GregsTutoringNYC
05-05-2019, 08:37 PM
Sorry, seems I inadvertently mislead. I did not go to an independent or private school. I went to Brooklyn Tech but with similar sentiments et al.

acollado815
05-06-2019, 03:23 PM
I went to the holderness school in New Hampshire, and my wife went to hackley in riverdale. Through prep and college, I basically know a student of color at most private schools in the city and independent school I'm the north east. Prep offers many resources to help you cope with the transition, like how my boarding school had less than 10 minorities. The adjustment wasnt troubling in terms of grades and keeping up with the school work, we were usually much better prepared than most kids at these schools. Most of these schools administratively are very welcoming of prep kids. We are high achieving and, frankly, make them look good. We are frequently visited by Preps post placement counselors, and can always find someone to talk to at the org if we have issues. All the school have a relationship with Prep so we have a fantastic advocate if we have an issue.

NYCP4P
09-30-2019, 09:46 PM
Thank you all so far. This thread is the most helpful. I'm a parent of a 5th grader who's applying to P4P. I'm wondering how much financial assets play a part. We are middle class, basically not poor enough for any aid but not rich enough to pay for private school. Basically like an average family that's stuck in the middle.

Will you not get accepted based on income? When will they tell you? I read that people "they" considered to have money will still need to pay some form of tuition. I don't want my child to go through 14 months and come to find out that we still have to pay a lot for tuition and can't afford it (or we prefer to spend our $ on other things vs private school).... any insights?

Thanks