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  1. #121
    This is an article from 2013-not to give false hope but I just hope there's no false positives only false negatives hah!

    STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. - It turns out Staten Island public school students who were told they weren't "gifted and talented" might be so after all.

    An error on the part of Pearson, the company that developed New York City Schools "Gifted and Talented" exam, means many students who were told they didn't qualify for the program actually did, Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott said in a statement released late Friday afternoon.

    The error affects more than 4,735 test takers -- about 13 percent of the students who took the exam, according to the Department of Education.

    Of those students, 2,698 who didn't qualify for the gifted and talented program now qualify for district programs.

    Another 2,037 who previous qualified for district programs are even more gifted and talented than they thought -- they now qualify for citywide programs as well.

    All students who were previously told they qualify for the programs still do.

    "After an exhaustive review of Pearson's data, it is clear to us that due to the company's errors, many students who were recently notified that they did not qualify for G&T now qualify for district programs," Walcott said. "In addition, many other students who didn't previously qualify for city wide programs now do."

    All students who were previously deemed eligible for the programs will remain so -- and some of them may qualify for even more elite programs.

    Despite Walcott's wording, it wasn't so much Pearson that discovered the errors -- it was two parents who noticed scores didn't add up.

    "Two parents initially brought their concerns to our attention. My team immediately asked Pearson to investigate," Walcott said. "Throughout this week, Pearson has been working to confirm the existence of errors, identify how many students were affected and rectify those errors."

    The incorrect results were due to two errors -- some students being incorrectly categorized in the wrong age group, and the use of an incorrect scoring key.

    "I have told the company's officials in no uncertain terms that I expect this will never happen again," says Walcott.
    While Pearson CEO of Assessment and Instruction Doug Kubach has apologized, Walcott called the mistakes "unacceptable."

    "Pearson has an established record in this field and we depend on its professionalism and deep capacity to deliver for the public," Walcott said. "But in this case they let our children and families down. I have told the company's officials in no uncertain terms that I expect this will never happen again."

    But it's not the first time Pearson's in the spotlight. The test company, which also designs state exams, was lampooned last year for a confusing question about a talking pineapple on state exams. Many other questions were also struck from state exams due to errors last year.

    In a statement, Scott Smith, president for Learning Assessment, said they fully understand the impact of incorrect scoring.

    "We successfully score millions of high-stakes tests for customers throughout the world and believe that our scoring processes adhere to the best practices in the industry," Smith said. "It is clear that we had a breakdown in our processes and we are conducting a complete, extensive investigation of every step in our processes to fully understand how these errors occurred."

    The company will also bring in external experts to review their process, he said.

    "Pearson is truly sorry for our error and for the disruption and inconvenience caused to New York City families and children. We extend our deepest apologies to the New York City Department of Education," he said.

    Walcott said the city has already started working to mitigate the inconvenience. All affected families will be notified by phone and email over the next 24 hours, and will receive updated scores by April 29. The deadline for submitting applications will be extended to May 10, to help families reconsider their options.

    In addition to the score errors, 400 students were affected by missing score reports from Pearson. The tests have been found, Walcott said, and affected families were contacted.

    UFT President Michael Mulgrew, a Staten Island resident, had harsh words for the company in charge of high-stakes testing for the state's students.

    "Thousands of children and parents get the wrong results on a very important test. Only after parents urge an investigation does the DOE act; it then blames the testing company and tries to bury the announcement on a Friday afternoon," Mulgrew said in a statement.

    "Mayor Bloomberg may wonder why parents have so little faith in his management of the schools. Parents may wonder why the DOE trusts the testing company - Pearson - to develop the curriculum for the new and more demanding state tests the kids are already sitting for this week," he continued.

  2. #122
    It seems that this year there are a lot less kids who qualify.

  3. #123
    Quote Originally Posted by Macklemore108 View Post
    Last year I calculated the odds of getting into N or A were around 25% with a 99 and another 25% for D2 families (so total 50% chance of getting "at least" Lower Lab). This year there are fewer 99s so I chances are now 30/60% respectively.
    Does this apply to grade 1 as well?

  4. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by preeti08 View Post
    Does this apply to grade 1 as well?
    For Grade 1 I haven't calculated the odds but it looks pretty similar this year based on looking at the number of new available seats (6 per class for Grade 1) compared to seats available for K (25 seats) and then looking at the proportion of 99s split between K and 1 (787 K, 191 1st grade). Other things will affect this of course, like siblings but I don't have that information.

  5. #125
    Was wondering if anyone can calculate the odds for me for district 31 with score of 95. 23 scored 99, 26 scored 97-98 and 112 scored 90-96.

  6. #126
    Hello all!

    Quick question. My daughter scored a 98. We are considering applying for Anderson as #1 and a district G ant T as our second choice. My question is, does she have a better chance of getting in to our District G and T if we forget about Anderson and place the District one as our first choice (since the chances at Anderson are pretty slim)? If someone in our district who also scored a 98 places the District one first, do they have a better chance at getting accepted because we put the District one as second? Thanks in advance!

  7. #127
    Order of preference does NOT effect your chances of landing a seat, so you should rank your true preference. In other words, someone who ranks your district program 1st does NOT have any sort of advantage. Seats are assigned by lottery. All 99s go first. Then the 98s, etc. when the computer pulls your child's name in the lottery, it will look at your preference list and match you with your highest ranked program that still has seats available. If your child's name is pulled before your 98 neighbors, you will get a spot even if you ranked the school 2nd and they ranked it 1st.

    There's no harm, then, in listing Anderson 1st. But, realistically, Anderson seats will fill with all 99s (who go 1st in the lottery).

  8. #128
    Quote Originally Posted by SOSMom View Post
    Hi, so what are the chances of getting into Nest+m with a 99% and we are in district 1, does that increase our chances?
    I'd say around 30% ballpark this year. District you live in doesn't matter for NEST.

  9. #129
    Quote Originally Posted by D25Mommy View Post
    Order of preference does NOT effect your chances of landing a seat, so you should rank your true preference. In other words, someone who ranks your district program 1st does NOT have any sort of advantage. Seats are assigned by lottery. All 99s go first. Then the 98s, etc. when the computer pulls your child's name in the lottery, it will look at your preference list and match you with your highest ranked program that still has seats available. If your child's name is pulled before your 98 neighbors, you will get a spot even if you ranked the school 2nd and they ranked it 1st.

    There's no harm, then, in listing Anderson 1st. But, realistically, Anderson seats will fill with all 99s (who go 1st in the lottery).
    So if we listed Anderson first, then 30th Avenue, then PS 32, it still wouldn't matter since the lottery system would just cycle down my preferences until a seat is found, without any effect on the chance at PS 32, correct?

    I really like PS 32, but I might as well give it a shot at one of the citywide schools, right?

  10. #130
    That's my understanding as well.
    Also QueensDad, good to know that you are looking at PS32. I am from D25 and considering that school as well. There is very little information about district G&T in D25 apart from this board and valuable insights from users like D25Mommy and Enlightened.
    Please do share your insight on PS32 (and other D25 G&T programs) for the benefit of this board.
    Thanks

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