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Thread: Q300?

  1. #11
    D25Mommy and Wayne,
    Thanks a lot for your replies. The Q300 program sounds solid and promising. My kid is entering 1st. Hopefully the transition would be easy.
    Thanks
    P

  2. #12
    My daughter got into K. We are happy with the result and look forward to her starting school there.
    I had a couple of questions for existing parents:
    1. We mainly speak Russian at home and our daughter is much stronger in Russian than English in terms of speaking and her early reading. We even took the G&T test in russian. Did any of the parents with a similar situation at Q300 have any issues with their child being very behind in terms of literacy or do these kids just quickly catch up once they are in a school environment?
    2. We are in North Brooklyn and it looks like it will be about an hour bus ride to and from school next year. How are the 5 year olds handling these types of long commutes? More worried about the morning rides, can they sleep a little while riding to school?
    3. What are some of the changes that you see happening in the school after the new (current) principal came in? Are you happy with the current direction of the school?
    Thank you!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by D25Mommy View Post
    Are you for real? Q300 is a citywide. By definition, it is exclusive because you must test in to be admitted. Clearly, you know this since you had your child take the test. But now you want to criticize the school because it tries to take a progressive approach to education? And you will do so by throwing in the "uber-progressive St. Ann's" THAT COSTS $50,000 per year to show how the school is not sufficiently "correcting unfair privilege"? SERIOUSLY?! You spout about "cruel irony" but see none in your own words?

    And I like the uniforms. They serve a practical purpose (since the school is co-located). The policy is loosely applied, but I'm fairly strict in having my kids wear the uniform because it spares me the drama of the "what to wear" morning routine. If you have beef with the uniforms, don't come to the school. Problem solved. 99% of other publics, or--gasp--St. Ann's, might be a better fit for you. The hypocrisy of someone criticizing a progressive school for not conforming with other progressives is just astounding! Do you seriously not get the irony of your own circular argument?

    Q300 is a public school that must conform to DOE rules and regulations. Within that narrow framework, it tries to be more progressive than other publics. Namely, it focuses on "whole child" development that emphasizes the social as much as the academic (which, in my opinion, is good for scary smart students who can be a bit self-centered). That's where the inclusion part comes in: students are expected to think of, and include, others. The school is also more progressive in its stance on homework and student led exploration. But there is a tension within the school between those parents who want a very progressive approach and those that want the academic rigor along the lines of the other citywides. There has been a switch in administration, and the new principal is re-shifting the balance. Honestly, I get the sense that the school will move in the direction of more academic rigor, with components of a progressive approach left in place where it has proven to work. This may not be what you are looking for (based on your words above). There is a small percentage of "intense" parents who think like you, but I would not say you guys are in the majority. Perhaps you should again revisit your choice because I sense your expectations of the school are wholly unrealistic.

    "But now you want to criticize the school because it tries to take a progressive approach to education?"

    Am I criticizing progressive education?

    "And you will do so by throwing in the "uber-progressive St. Ann's" THAT COSTS $50,000 per year to show how the school is not sufficiently 'correcting unfair privilege'?"

    Or advocating for more progressive education (as defined by Dewey)?

    Which one is it?

    "Q300 is a public school that must conform to DOE rules and regulations. Within that narrow framework, it tries to be more progressive than other publics."

    Understood that Q300 is a public school but what does "it tries to be more progressive than other publics" mean?

    "Namely, it focuses on "whole child" development that emphasizes the social as much as the academic"

    As opposed to what schools? How?

    "(which, in my opinion, is good for scary smart students who can be a bit self-centered)."

    Scary smart students are more self-centered than those not considered scary smart?

    "That's where the inclusion part comes in: students are expected to think of, and include, others."

    Other schools don't expect students to think of others?

    "The school is also more progressive in its stance on homework and student led exploration."

    As opposed to who? What? Where?

    "Honestly, I get the sense that the school will move in the direction of more academic rigor, with components of a progressive approach left in place where it has proven to work."

    What are those components of "a progressive approach"?

    And what is meant by "academic rigor"?

    "There is a small percentage of 'intense' parents who think like you."

    Intense? Then what do you call a 414-word reply replete with unsolicited advice ("Perhaps you should again re-visit your choice" and "If you have beef with the uniforms, don't come to the school" and "St. Ann's, might be a better fit for you" and "This may not be what you are looking for") and charges of hypocrisy ("The hypocrisy of someone criticizing a progressive school") and all-cap shouting ("SERIOUSLY?!") and ad hominem between scare quotes ("'intense'")?
    Last edited by Queens Resident; 06-03-2017 at 07:22 PM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Queens Resident View Post
    Intense? Then what do you call a 414-word reply replete with unsolicited advice ("Perhaps you should again re-visit your choice" and "If you have beef with the uniforms, don't come to the school" and "St. Ann's, might be a better fit for you" and "This may not be what you are looking for") and charges of hypocrisy ("The hypocrisy of someone criticizing a progressive school") and all-cap shouting ("SERIOUSLY?!") and ad hominem between scare quotes ("'intense'")?
    LOL. You post YOUR (yes, I'm shouting) unsolicited ramblings on a thread whose very point is to solicit advice. What did you think you were going to get, accolades for your "brilliant" (uh oh, "scare" quotes) word choice and utterly pointless rhetoric?

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by D25Mommy View Post
    1. All the grades have music at least once a week. It's a PTA paid for enrichment (as are most of the others). The program is run by the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music. Lower grades have dalcroze/solfage type of instruction. 1st grade also had chorus. 3rd grade played the recorder. I believe the middle school has violin instruction. Visual Art is also once a week and is run by staff from Art House Astoria. The kids studied pastels, watercolors, and all the various art movements. I don't believe there is a dedicated art room in the lower school (space is an issue), but there is one in the middle school. Grades 2 and up also have dance. In the fall, there was a program through Alvin Ailey. In the spring, the kids have been working with a faculty member from American Ballet Theater (who happens to be a parent at the school and is generously volunteering her time and resources). Grade 2, I believe, also studied architecture. This is all in addition to Spanich (twice a week), Technology/Coding (twice a week), and gym (twice a week). One of the K teachers also applied for and received a "mindfulness" grant so both K classes had yoga this year. I believe the program is supposed to expand to the other grades next year. Lower grades also have explorations at least 3 times a week.

    2. Q300 and its co-located school do NOT mingle. The 2 schools share the lunchroom, auditorium, and outdoor recess space, but each school has its own designated times. For example, the other school has lunch from 10:30 to 12:00 while Q300 has lunch from 12 to 1pm. The 2 schools start and end at different times and they have their own staff (I believe the nurse is the only staff member that is shared because Q300 is not yet big enough for the DOE to pay for a separate nurse). I believe this is the typical setup for all co-located schools.

    3. The PTA raises a boatload of $$$$ and is extremely active. I don't know the number per student, but I can tell you that this year alone they have raised close to $200K from the direct appeal, $25K from the silent auction, and tens of thousands more from a slew of other fundraisers. And this is for a school that only has slightly more than 300 students.

    4. I wouldn't worry about the transition. The teachers will fill in any gaps. Socially, I advise that you come to the welcome breakfast in June and the school picnic at the end of August just so your child can make a few friends before school starts. If your child hasn't studied a foreign language, you may also want to download some kind of Spanish app just to get exposed to some of the basics. But the last is not a biggie. Again, the teacher will help to catch your child up to the rest of the class.
    Thanks a lot for the detailed response. I look forward to meeting some of the Q300 folks at the upcoming welcome breakfast.

  6. #16
    Re: Interactions with co-located school PS17

    In the previous two years we've shared lunch with PS17. While we do not this year (for scheduling and our school was bigger), Bill, our principal, said we MAY next year because of scheduling again. Also, the after school program, Serious Fun is run with a mixed population between PS17 and Q300. Our third grade Computer Science class invited kids from PS17 on the day of coding (since they do not get computer science). We even have joint fundraisers with them that are lots of fun! (Movie nights, zumbathons...)

    Just wanted to share a sentiment one parents has with students at Serious Fun:
    "in fact, my son just came from a play date with a PS 17 K kid he met in Serious Fun. He loves his PS 17 friends and I am glad he has a chance to connect and make friends there."

    Kids who go straight home afterschool don't have the interaction during Serious Fun though. But there are opportunities through the joint fundraisers.

    Hope this helps!

  7. #17

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by kukushka View Post
    My daughter got into K. We are happy with the result and look forward to her starting school there.
    I had a couple of questions for existing parents:
    1. We mainly speak Russian at home and our daughter is much stronger in Russian than English in terms of speaking and her early reading. We even took the G&T test in russian. Did any of the parents with a similar situation at Q300 have any issues with their child being very behind in terms of literacy or do these kids just quickly catch up once they are in a school environment?
    2. We are in North Brooklyn and it looks like it will be about an hour bus ride to and from school next year. How are the 5 year olds handling these types of long commutes? More worried about the morning rides, can they sleep a little while riding to school?
    3. What are some of the changes that you see happening in the school after the new (current) principal came in? Are you happy with the current direction of the school?
    Thank you!
    1. I wouldn't worry too much with the language. Echoing D25Mommy's sentiment, the teachers will help identify any gaps, and will work with families to help address any specific areas of concern. For language, I don't see english as a second language as a concern. If you stick with the 20mins of reading (in English ) You should be AOK.
    2. Our ride in the morning is about 40 minutes. Little one sleep on the bus all the time! I wouldn't worry about that.
    3. I'm in alignment with where the school is headed. The teachers are great, so I have no complaints. I know where my child's strengths and weaknesses are, and I've worked with teachers on approaches to help. (The Parent Engagement workshops are great, and it taught me a lot about what they're learning, and how they're learning it.)

  8. #18
    After cooling down, I have a few more questions.

    I read that Q300 kids has computer science or introduction to coding, when will that start? K? 1st? My boy doesn't have that in a district program, but we found toys and tools to introduce him the ideas and he loves it.

    What about other "STEM" or engineering concepts?

    How's the Serious Fun after school program? Is it really helpful as an enrichment? there's a Spanish program which he may need.

    Thanks
    p

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by pm3292003 View Post
    1. I wouldn't worry too much with the language. Echoing D25Mommy's sentiment, the teachers will help identify any gaps, and will work with families to help address any specific areas of concern. For language, I don't see english as a second language as a concern. If you stick with the 20mins of reading (in English ) You should be AOK.
    2. Our ride in the morning is about 40 minutes. Little one sleep on the bus all the time! I wouldn't worry about that.
    3. I'm in alignment with where the school is headed. The teachers are great, so I have no complaints. I know where my child's strengths and weaknesses are, and I've worked with teachers on approaches to help. (The Parent Engagement workshops are great, and it taught me a lot about what they're learning, and how they're learning it.)
    Thank you. Your answer set aside our few concerns. I agree that we should switch to English reading this summer. We mainly do everything in Russian because we understand the inevitability of English taking over, but I agree that we should help her transition into next year just with a little more English reading. Also glad that they are able to sleep on the bus and we will certainly take advantage of the Parent Engagement workshops. Thanks again.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by pcates View Post
    After cooling down, I have a few more questions.

    I read that Q300 kids has computer science or introduction to coding, when will that start? K? 1st? My boy doesn't have that in a district program, but we found toys and tools to introduce him the ideas and he loves it.

    What about other "STEM" or engineering concepts?

    How's the Serious Fun after school program? Is it really helpful as an enrichment? there's a Spanish program which he may need.

    Thanks
    p
    Computer Science/Coding
    We started coding in kindergarten, and I think they use Scratch, that does continue to 2nd grade.

    You can read more about the second grade's Architecture residency here:
    https://main.aiany.org/eOCULUS/newsl...ester-wrap-up/

    My family takes the bus home from school, so I don't have much feedback on Serious Fun. I do hear good things about them though, and have never heard a complaint.

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