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Thread: Q300?

  1. #21
    Hello, Q300 parents, thank you for starting this thread. We received 1st grade entry. I have same concern about the transition. I heard the teaching is fast, the kids in kindergarten may already learn 1st's math, is this true? How about the Spanish lesson, do you have any apps recommended for my child to learn some basics. Thank you!

  2. #22
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    @QueensResident: Let's not kid ourselves thinking that our kids are "supremely gifted and talented" because they passed an arbitrary test and may have been lucky enough in the lottery to get into a certain school. Also, the concept of "inclusion" annoys me but for a different reason. Where is the inclusion? Here are the demographics for Q300:

    Asian: 44%
    Black: 6%
    Hispanic: 9%
    White: 31%
    English language learners: 2%
    Students with special needs: 5%

    What is inclusive about this? I think the lottery system needs to be done away with. At the very least, all kids with a citywide qualifying score should be assessed individually to make sure that the final student body is as diverse as possible. Until then, inclusion is just a word.

  3. #23
    Thank you for all the information. We received the offer from 300 as well but still considering because of commuting and co-locating. Our kid is in district GT program and she likes it. But we don't know if it really worth to spend extra 1 hour on commuting and traffic. Also when I mentioned to her about new school ,she asked if some of her friends in current school will come.After knowing they won't , she is disappointed......
    Any advice please?
    Thank you

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by h2o.work View Post
    Thank you for all the information. We received the offer from 300 as well but still considering because of commuting and co-locating. Our kid is in district GT program and she likes it. But we don't know if it really worth to spend extra 1 hour on commuting and traffic. Also when I mentioned to her about new school ,she asked if some of her friends in current school will come.After knowing they won't , she is disappointed......
    Any advice please?
    Thank you
    I think I had the same problem here....But my choice is taking this offer!
    I will arrange playdate with her friends who live around us if they want to ,until one day they have new friends...
    About the commute ,I am still waiting for the school bus information coming up.That is the best thing I can do for her.As a mom,I have no regret.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by nanerssonne View Post
    @QueensResident: Let's not kid ourselves thinking that our kids are "supremely gifted and talented" because they passed an arbitrary test and may have been lucky enough in the lottery to get into a certain school. Also, the concept of "inclusion" annoys me but for a different reason. Where is the inclusion? Here are the demographics for Q300:

    Asian: 44%
    Black: 6%
    Hispanic: 9%
    White: 31%
    English language learners: 2%
    Students with special needs: 5%

    What is inclusive about this? I think the lottery system needs to be done away with. At the very least, all kids with a citywide qualifying score should be assessed individually to make sure that the final student body is as diverse as possible. Until then, inclusion is just a word.
    Interesting comment...the kids already were assessed individually through the test. i don't know how feasible it is to further interview each kid for their academic and/or extracurricular potential - these are primarily kids in preschool and they don't have any track record. And teacher assessment can be very biased and/or skewed. "Diversity" should be used for those who are interested in attending "politically correct" schools. G&T school admission process should be race blind, i.e. merit/performance based.

  6. #26
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    Yes, it should be merit/performance-based. BUT, what I said is that WITHIN THE QUALIFYING POOL, i.e. kids scoring 97-99, there should be room to choose by means other than lottery to make up a diverse student body.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by nanerssonne View Post
    Yes, it should be merit/performance-based. BUT, what I said is that WITHIN THE QUALIFYING POOL, i.e. kids scoring 97-99, there should be room to choose by means other than lottery to make up a diverse student body.
    other things equal, how would one justify picking a 97% kid instead of a 99% kid? in the name of diversity? it's a two street, a school chooses kids based on their test performance, and whether kids applied for admission to that specific school, while parents also choose schools by specifying order of preference based on their location, their kids' test score, and what they believe is best for their kids. would it be fair to deny a 99% kid access to a certain school and put him/her in a school of his/her second choice and give the spot to a 97% kid in the name of diversity? arguably no.

    As a matter of fact, practically no citywide G&T schools ever admitted a kid who scored below 99% and does not have a sibling in that school. existing process may not be ideal, but at least it is fair to everyone.

  8. #28
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    That's because you're assuming that a kid scoring 97 or 98 is somehow less intelligent, capable or worthy than one who got a 99. This is just a silly premise, given that these scores are based on one test and a variance of 1-2 questions. And, yes, I think having a student body that actually reflects the composition of the kids in this city is justification enough.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by molemod View Post
    As a matter of fact, practically no citywide G&T schools ever admitted a kid who scored below 99% and does not have a sibling in that school. existing process may not be ideal, but at least it is fair to everyone.
    Well, the fact that few Citywides have admitted those below 99% in recent years is simply because there aren't enough seats, right? I'm inclined to agree with the poster who points out that there probably isn't much difference between a 97% kid and a 99% one (and I say this as a parent of a kid who got 99% twice, in two consecutive years).

    As to the argument that the current system is fair to everyone, isn't it less fair to kids without siblings?

    And also, arguably, isn't the current process less fair to kids in areas that are far from the Citywides and won't qualify for a bus, or who don't have a decent local district G&T, so their families don't bother with the tests? Or for kids who aren't in district 2 where there's a dedicated all-G&T school?

    As a practical matter, it also seems that the G&T programs are under attack, and if one wants to keep them, one is better off buying into changes that might increase diversity and access of currently underrepresented populations, otherwise, there might not even be a G&T process in a few years.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by InwoodParent View Post
    there might not even be a G&T process in a few years.
    While many from many walks of life are pointing to expansion of G&T in various ways as a solution to many things, as I see the current climate, the DOE is already leaning towards removing G&T.
    Passionate tutor of Elementary School subjects specializing in NY state tests, and the specialized high/middle school tests (SHSAT, Hunter, TACHS/CHSEE, BCA, MS 54, Anderson...)

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