+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by tribeca_mom View Post
    Pick12lotto - Maybe this is off topic, but not sure where you are getting that an ICT is "dreaded"? Most people I know prefer it - two full teachers in a class is great. At our very highly ranked current GedEd, the parents request it so much that the non-IEP kids have to "take turns" getting a spot in the ICT class. Just wanted to give you my perspective if this is a concern of yours. My child is in her grade's ICT class right now and it is great, much more attention per child.
    hi tribeca_mom, I don't know whether ICT should be "dreaded" -- or as you suggest, preferred! I just don't know what to make of ICT one way or the other, or how variable an experience ICT classes can be. I really appreciate your sharing your positive experience with it. As I noted earlier, my friends who were initially concerned about ICT ended up feeling like you once their kid was in the class -- they were really happy with it, and said it was probably the best year yet for their kid. I don't know whether there are any parents of non-IEP kids who have had a less positive experience in ICT classes. This was suggested to me more hypothetically, i.e. what if there is an above-average level of disruption in a particular class such that even two teachers aren't enough? Maybe that's just not a very realistic concern -- like I said, I don't know, and haven't really dug into it much yet. But I'm glad to hear your daughter has had such a great experience with it and thanks again for the reassurance.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by thewildrobot View Post
    Forgive me if this is something you've already already thought of or tried: I saw on another post that this user lives on the UES and transferred her daughter from PS290 to PS33 after kindergarten. That's not the exact same situation you're in, of course, but in case no one responds who does the UES > PS33 commute, you might try sending her a private message to get her thoughts on the commuting aspect. You might also consider contacting the PS33 PTA to see if they'll put you in touch with UES parents who could give you more details about the commute. We contacted them about something else and they were very responsive. Good luck!
    @thewildrobot, I dug up a previous thoughtful post you'd made on the commute vs. value of a district G&T when another parent was asking about PS6 vs. a district G&T in general (rather than PS33 or any other one specifically). http://www.theschoolboards.com/showt...ll=1#post19071

    I'm curious if now, with all the Open Houses and whatever additional digging and thinking you've done since then, your opinion ("For our family, it would be a tough sell to leave one of the 'superstar' zoned elementary schools (like PS 6, PS 40, PS 41, PS 87, PS 321, etc.) to go to another K-5 school, G&T or no, that required a non-walking commute.") is the same or not -- and if it changed in some way, what's driven that?

    (And what do you think is the list of "superstar" zoned schools? I'm pretty ignorant about other zoned schools besides the local ones around me.)

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by pick12lotto View Post
    @thewildrobot, I dug up a previous thoughtful post you'd made on the commute vs. value of a district G&T when another parent was asking about PS6 vs. a district G&T in general (rather than PS33 or any other one specifically). http://www.theschoolboards.com/showt...ll=1#post19071

    I'm curious if now, with all the Open Houses and whatever additional digging and thinking you've done since then, your opinion ("For our family, it would be a tough sell to leave one of the 'superstar' zoned elementary schools (like PS 6, PS 40, PS 41, PS 87, PS 321, etc.) to go to another K-5 school, G&T or no, that required a non-walking commute.") is the same or not -- and if it changed in some way, what's driven that?
    Hi there! That's a good question -- thanks for making me think about it. For our family, the commuting issue is still very important, but yes, having gone through the process, I think I would temper that comment, for two reasons:

    1) We didn't expect the schools to vary so much in their philosophy and 'feel.' While we thought there'd be little differences here and there, the philosophical and atmospheric gulf between -- to pick the opposite poles of the schools we looked at -- TAG and PS11 is quite substantial. Seeing those differences led us to have a lot of conversations about what we really wanted in a school and what would be best for our kid, and I could well imagine that if our zoned school was very strong but a G&T school that required a bus ride seemed like a better fit for our child, we'd be a lot more willing to trade the walking commute for the bus than we initially thought.

    2) The quality of the student work in some of the G&T classrooms we visited was much higher than I anticipated. I think our attitude at the outset was a little bit along the lines of, "It's kindergarten -- how much can G&T matter?" But seeing the work that some of these kids did -- particularly the essays -- was eye-opening. The only point of comparison we had was to work we'd seen in our assigned gen-ed school, which is a friendly place but middle-of-the-pack performance-wise, so maybe we would have thought differently if we were comparing the G&T work to the work at a really high performing gen-ed, but as it was, some of the G&T work we saw was much, much stronger than what we'd seen previously. Again, maybe that says as much about our gen-ed (or our perceptions of our gen-ed, or the work the gen-ed teachers chose to put on the wall that week, etc.) as it does about the strength of some of the G&T kids and classrooms, but in our circumstances, it did make us think that there would be real value in having our kid in a G&T class. (If gen-ed class sizes were small enough that teachers could easily employ differentiated instruction across a wide range of abilities, having our child in a room full of high-ability kids wouldn't matter so much at this age, but with up to 32 kids in a class starting in first grade at most schools, we thought it would be best for our child to be more or less guaranteed a high 'floor' in the classroom, as well as more or less guaranteed to have kids to 'chase.') So we came away from the tours with a sense that we would be willing to take on a non-walking commute for certain schools. (Not all of our G&T choices required a non-walking commute, so we had a bit of luxury there.)

    What about you? I infer from your question that you're still undecided about PS6 vs. PS33, but did your thoughts about the schools, the value of G&T, etc. change over the course of the process? It's an interesting situation (and one that was totally foreign to me -- where I grew up, there was only one school and everyone went there!).

  4. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    29
    @pick12lotto. A year ago my family went through the exact decision making process. We are zoned to PS6 (still in the zone today) and was offered a spot to PS33. We ultimately got off the waitlist from PS11, which is where my kid is now. All families are different in considering their situations when making a decision and choice, therefore my family experience would just be a data point.

    I agree with you all the PS6 benefits that you have listed: close proximity to where we live, strong gen-ed performance (can’t miss that blue ribbon recognition hanging from the school wall), nice building and facility (newly completed playground & roof garden), very well-funded PTA (actually a very important aspect in public school), and in a very nice area of the neighborhood. Yet ultimately, we just didn’t get a connection to the school. PS6 was a very nice fall-back option if we can’t get into a G&T school that we like; sometimes to this day when it’s tough to get our kid up early in the morning to catch that 7:30am bus, it does cross my mind that it would be kind of nice to just have a 5-10 minutes walk to school.

    Now can I say my kid absolutely is in a better situation in a G&T class @PS11 than if enrolling at PS6? I would not boldly make such claim. But would my kid have learned as well as in a gen-ed class than a G&T? That I am not so sure. While I can’t speak about all other G&T classes at different schools, from my experience the teacher in my kid’s class certainly pushes them further in their learning ability. My kid went from only knowing a few alphabets when entering kindergarten to reading simple chapter books now, which is typically considered for first-grade level reading. I would not consider my kid special in anyway because many of the kids in the same classroom are all reading at similar levels. In a gen-ed class this may not happen, as teacher is more likely teaching to the average so that every kid can follow through and not fall behind. Understandably all public schools have to use the DOE curriculum, but I think G&T teachers can have more flexibility in structuring their teaching methods, and can indeed go in deeper level if kids can absorb the materials, that gen-ed teachers may not use.

    I don’t want to make this an argument between specific schools as I think each school has its strength and area to improve, but more in getting you to think why doing the G&T test in the first place. We already know which schools have G&T, and certainly there is preferred one(s) (jokingly I would say for all UES families they will be lying if they don’t have Lower Lab as first choice among D2 G&T schools). Yet unless you are absolutely convinced that it’s only this or that G&T school to consider and nothing else, before knowing what score the kid will get and how lottery will play out, you are basically open to most of the G&T schools that’s available, from the position you are in. Certainly we agonizing over when results are in and not with our preferred choice, but at the end of day it’s about what you really believe in giving the best opportunity for your kid. Maybe it involves some leap of faith, your gut (my family certainly did), or maybe even some luck (getting that waitlist offer). There is no true answer but we will just need to live with the choice we make.

    Lastly, borrowing from an advice I saw last year. If your kid truly can’t go through the commute or is unhappy at the G&T school, you can always transfer back to PS6 as long as you are still in the zone.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by thewildrobot View Post
    Hi there! That's a good question -- thanks for making me think about it. For our family, the commuting issue is still very important, but yes, having gone through the process, I think I would temper that comment, for two reasons:

    1) We didn't expect the schools to vary so much in their philosophy and 'feel.' While we thought there'd be little differences here and there, the philosophical and atmospheric gulf between -- to pick the opposite poles of the schools we looked at -- TAG and PS11 is quite substantial. Seeing those differences led us to have a lot of conversations about what we really wanted in a school and what would be best for our kid, and I could well imagine that if our zoned school was very strong but a G&T school that required a bus ride seemed like a better fit for our child, we'd be a lot more willing to trade the walking commute for the bus than we initially thought.

    2) The quality of the student work in some of the G&T classrooms we visited was much higher than I anticipated. I think our attitude at the outset was a little bit along the lines of, "It's kindergarten -- how much can G&T matter?" But seeing the work that some of these kids did -- particularly the essays -- was eye-opening. The only point of comparison we had was to work we'd seen in our assigned gen-ed school, which is a friendly place but middle-of-the-pack performance-wise, so maybe we would have thought differently if we were comparing the G&T work to the work at a really high performing gen-ed, but as it was, some of the G&T work we saw was much, much stronger than what we'd seen previously. Again, maybe that says as much about our gen-ed (or our perceptions of our gen-ed, or the work the gen-ed teachers chose to put on the wall that week, etc.) as it does about the strength of some of the G&T kids and classrooms, but in our circumstances, it did make us think that there would be real value in having our kid in a G&T class. (If gen-ed class sizes were small enough that teachers could easily employ differentiated instruction across a wide range of abilities, having our child in a room full of high-ability kids wouldn't matter so much at this age, but with up to 32 kids in a class starting in first grade at most schools, we thought it would be best for our child to be more or less guaranteed a high 'floor' in the classroom, as well as more or less guaranteed to have kids to 'chase.') So we came away from the tours with a sense that we would be willing to take on a non-walking commute for certain schools. (Not all of our G&T choices required a non-walking commute, so we had a bit of luxury there.)

    What about you? I infer from your question that you're still undecided about PS6 vs. PS33, but did your thoughts about the schools, the value of G&T, etc. change over the course of the process? It's an interesting situation (and one that was totally foreign to me -- where I grew up, there was only one school and everyone went there!).
    Hey, thanks for your reply!

    To your first point, I totally get that. There was quite a range. I guess we shouldn't be shocked as there are plenty of anecdotes/InsideSchools profiles out there, but when you really see it and hear it in person, it's striking. I find myself in the odd position of not feeling like there's a "best fit" per se, largely because PS6 seems like a very "complete" school. It's hard to knock it on any particular dimension... I think all I can say is it doesn't have G&T and the assumed benefits you note (e.g. high 'floors', having kids to 'chase', and perhaps some additional flexibility in the teaching approach that's more tailored to a G&T kid, though I think the latter is sort of another way of expressing the benefit of the "higher floor" assumption). I don't think the general "philosophical approach" is much different between PS6 and PS33, e.g. there is no "optional homework" but neither is at TAG levels of homework intensity in K either. There is a pretty decent chunk of PS6 kids hitting 4's in their ELAs and Math (I want to say somewhere between 60% and 80% depending on the subgroup and test in grade 4, but that's a rough recollection). It seems like PS33 G&T is more likely to be 4's for the vast majority of the kids. All of that is to say that this probably confirms the "higher floor" point, though as you noted given the very high percentage of kids at PS6 scoring 3 or 4's, query whether the PS6 "floor" is particularly concerning -- hard to say. One thing the PS6 principal said at their "Taste of Kindergarten" day was that this is not a sprint. I don't think she was saying take it easy or anything like that, but this kind of leads to the work product point, in my mind at least...

    To your second point, I'm very curious what/where stuck out to you in terms of student work. I feel like I tried to take this stuff in because everyone says look at the school work, but inevitably it was like fleeting glances at a few pieces here and there as tours marched on at a brisk pace. I was very impressed with the handwriting and coherent arguments made by the TAG K students about "why come to TAG." And some of the art I saw at TAG was unlike anything I'd seen elsewhere, and that impressed me too. If we had an offer to TAG, I'd have to seriously confront the question of whether that level of academic enrichment is worth the tradeoffs -- i.e. at TAG I think it is very much a "sprint." But in general, I was almost surprised in that I felt there wasn't a huge amount of variance in work product. It all seemed... fine, but not particularly mind-blowing. I saw a lot of "how to do X" stuff in the various G&T K programs, and they all seemed pretty similar to me. Maybe I was oblivious or just didn't look at the right stuff. I also paid more attention to lower grade work product and didn't see a ton of upper grade stuff, which might have been instructive as I suspect differentiation is probably easier to notice there. I'd love to hear your take on PS33 student work vs. what you saw in other programs. [If you'd rather PM any of this, that's fine with me.] I also have little recollection of PS6 work product. So I don't have a great basis for comparison there. But I know parents of smart kids at PS6 who seem very satisfied with the work their kids have done, at least in the earlier grades.

    Your reply also drives home that you're personally comparing G&Ts to a "non-superstar" gen-ed. It'd be an easier decision for us to give up a short commute if the zoned gen-ed wasn't as complete a package as PS6 (to your point about class sizes in this post, and about the value of a well-funded PTA in your earlier post, PS6 funds TAs in every classroom, which I think makes a real difference). Your earlier post was really diving into the benefits of PS6 (and other "superstar" gen-eds) and whether the potential benefits of a G&T are worth the trade offs. The challenge is the costs are pretty clear and the benefits are harder to be sure of. So we're still thinking it over, but I think the good news is that I'm pretty sure either path is probably pretty good.

    And yes, like you, the system wasn't like this where I grew up. We did have G&T, but if you tested in, where you went was still all driven by where you lived, and that was generally all there was to it.

  6. #16
    [QUOTE=pick12lotto;20290] It seems like PS33 G&T is more likely to be 4's for the vast majority of the kids. All of that is to say that this probably confirms the "higher floor" point, though as you noted given the very high percentage of kids at PS6 scoring 3 or 4's, query whether the PS6 "floor" is particularly concerning -- hard to say


    ----
    Just to add to this comment... be very careful. There is a LOOOOOOT of outside of the school test prep going on in elementary school. It surprised the H*** out of me. To give you a specific example, I sent my older son to a 10 week prep class for the Hunter High school exam the fall of 6th grade. In the same class/session (they were taking a diagnostic and later split up) there were at least a dozen kids in 4th or 5th grade from PS33. It would never have occurred to me to send my child to this class a year or two early (it was a very intense class) but they told me that it was a top priority for them to start early. No judgement at all meant, but you need to look at the culture of the school and community to see if test prep is part of it (and what may be really influencing those scores). Hope this helps!!

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by fragglemama View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by pick12lotto View Post
    It seems like PS33 G&T is more likely to be 4's for the vast majority of the kids. All of that is to say that this probably confirms the "higher floor" point, though as you noted given the very high percentage of kids at PS6 scoring 3 or 4's, query whether the PS6 "floor" is particularly concerning -- hard to say

    ----
    Just to add to this comment... be very careful. There is a LOOOOOOT of outside of the school test prep going on in elementary school. It surprised the H*** out of me. To give you a specific example, I sent my older son to a 10 week prep class for the Hunter High school exam the fall of 6th grade. In the same class/session (they were taking a diagnostic and later split up) there were at least a dozen kids in 4th or 5th grade from PS33. It would never have occurred to me to send my child to this class a year or two early (it was a very intense class) but they told me that it was a top priority for them to start early. No judgement at all meant, but you need to look at the culture of the school and community to see if test prep is part of it (and what may be really influencing those scores). Hope this helps!!
    fragglemama, this is a very good point. Thanks for making it.

    It wouldn't surprise me at all to hear that there's a fair bit of prep-culture at PS33 G&T (or indeed, at many of the less-progressive/more-traditional G&Ts), and for that matter, at PS6 as well. So you're right -- my pointing to these test score distributions as evidence of a higher 'floor' in the G&T should be taken with a grain of salt.

    That said, prepping probably contributes to the [presumed] more "4-skewed" distribution for the G&Ts, but I'm guessing it's still only part of the story (i.e. the overall implication of a 'higher floor' still has something to it). For instance, you saw at least a dozen PS33 G&Ters at this Hunter High prep class -- but not all 50 of them (or maybe I should say 100 if you saw 4th and 5th graders). If there is a similar level of "extra" prepping happening for the state exams (a fairly unsubstantiated assumption on my part, I get that), then prep culture still wouldn't explain the results for all the kids. But I think perhaps more importantly, if I assume there is a reasonably similar amount of "extra prep" happening in the PS6 population (and again -- who knows?! -- but for this one, I'll hazard a guess that PS6's level of "extra prep" is probably close enough to PS33 G&T's level), I think we still kind of get to the 'higher floor' implication for PS33 G&T. But there are plenty of embedded assumptions in there, so I could be mistaken for all sorts of reasons.

    There's also the semi-related point that measuring schools by standardized test scores is rather one-dimensional and misses a lot of important social-emotional dimensions. That isn't lost on me either.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JustADad View Post
    @pick12lotto. A year ago my family went through the exact decision making process. We are zoned to PS6 (still in the zone today) and was offered a spot to PS33. We ultimately got off the waitlist from PS11, which is where my kid is now. All families are different in considering their situations when making a decision and choice, therefore my family experience would just be a data point.

    I agree with you all the PS6 benefits that you have listed: close proximity to where we live, strong gen-ed performance (can’t miss that blue ribbon recognition hanging from the school wall), nice building and facility (newly completed playground & roof garden), very well-funded PTA (actually a very important aspect in public school), and in a very nice area of the neighborhood. Yet ultimately, we just didn’t get a connection to the school. PS6 was a very nice fall-back option if we can’t get into a G&T school that we like; sometimes to this day when it’s tough to get our kid up early in the morning to catch that 7:30am bus, it does cross my mind that it would be kind of nice to just have a 5-10 minutes walk to school.

    Now can I say my kid absolutely is in a better situation in a G&T class @PS11 than if enrolling at PS6? I would not boldly make such claim. But would my kid have learned as well as in a gen-ed class than a G&T? That I am not so sure. While I can’t speak about all other G&T classes at different schools, from my experience the teacher in my kid’s class certainly pushes them further in their learning ability. My kid went from only knowing a few alphabets when entering kindergarten to reading simple chapter books now, which is typically considered for first-grade level reading. I would not consider my kid special in anyway because many of the kids in the same classroom are all reading at similar levels. In a gen-ed class this may not happen, as teacher is more likely teaching to the average so that every kid can follow through and not fall behind. Understandably all public schools have to use the DOE curriculum, but I think G&T teachers can have more flexibility in structuring their teaching methods, and can indeed go in deeper level if kids can absorb the materials, that gen-ed teachers may not use.

    I don’t want to make this an argument between specific schools as I think each school has its strength and area to improve, but more in getting you to think why doing the G&T test in the first place. We already know which schools have G&T, and certainly there is preferred one(s) (jokingly I would say for all UES families they will be lying if they don’t have Lower Lab as first choice among D2 G&T schools). Yet unless you are absolutely convinced that it’s only this or that G&T school to consider and nothing else, before knowing what score the kid will get and how lottery will play out, you are basically open to most of the G&T schools that’s available, from the position you are in. Certainly we agonizing over when results are in and not with our preferred choice, but at the end of day it’s about what you really believe in giving the best opportunity for your kid. Maybe it involves some leap of faith, your gut (my family certainly did), or maybe even some luck (getting that waitlist offer). There is no true answer but we will just need to live with the choice we make.

    Lastly, borrowing from an advice I saw last year. If your kid truly can’t go through the commute or is unhappy at the G&T school, you can always transfer back to PS6 as long as you are still in the zone.
    JustADad, I appreciate your taking the time to share this. I'd love to hear what you mean by "you didn't get a connection to [PS6]." Can you unpack that a bit -- what was missing for you that you didn't "connect"?

    Do you think you would have sent your kid to PS33 if he or she hadn't gotten off the PS11 waitlist?

    I've tried to be open to all the G&T programs and spent a fair bit of time hitting as many open houses as I could. I don't know if that was good or not... part of this "dilemma" now is the paradox of choice coming into play. I suspect many UES parents draw a line at Anderson and LL, maybe TAG, and leave it at those. (I don't know that LL is markedly superior to PS33 G&T or PS11 G&T, etc. I do know it'd be a much shorter commute for us, and I think that's a big part of why your joke about UES G&T parents totally hits home.)

    Your final point is particularly good and one we're going to reflect on it further, for sure. It may be there is just not a ton of downside to giving it a try and pulling back if it doesn't click in a reasonable period of time.

    Thank you again for giving some perspective from having been right where we are.

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by pick12lotto View Post
    JustADad, I appreciate your taking the time to share this. I'd love to hear what you mean by "you didn't get a connection to [PS6]." Can you unpack that a bit -- what was missing for you that you didn't "connect"?

    Do you think you would have sent your kid to PS33 if he or she hadn't gotten off the PS11 waitlist?

    I've tried to be open to all the G&T programs and spent a fair bit of time hitting as many open houses as I could. I don't know if that was good or not... part of this "dilemma" now is the paradox of choice coming into play. I suspect many UES parents draw a line at Anderson and LL, maybe TAG, and leave it at those. (I don't know that LL is markedly superior to PS33 G&T or PS11 G&T, etc. I do know it'd be a much shorter commute for us, and I think that's a big part of why your joke about UES G&T parents totally hits home.)

    Your final point is particularly good and one we're going to reflect on it further, for sure. It may be there is just not a ton of downside to giving it a try and pulling back if it doesn't click in a reasonable period of time.

    Thank you again for giving some perspective from having been right where we are.
    To be honest, there was not much to unpack really. We live in UES before having our kid, so have been familiar with all the good gen-ed elementary schools. We toured all of them during open house. I personally found better connection with PS158 actually. But again, PS6 proved to be the safest choice, if anything else doesn’t go our way. There is nothing specifics that I can say that would turn us away, but at the same time, we feel it’s not significantly different than the other public schools we see; therefore if we do have other choice(s), we will certainly consider it.

    And would we have sent our kid to PS33 if not gotten to PS11? Certainly, because we already made that decision by accepting the offer. I do like PS33 for the fact that when I went to the open house, I found (largely G&T) parents to be very passionate for the school and supportive of school administration, and the G&T teachers I spoke to were very impressive in their presentation & interaction. There were actually many outspoken PS33 parents on this board last year, and I learned a lot about the school from them, in addition to actual parents I spoke to during open house and new student orientation.

    I would agree that just comparing G&T classes, there is likely not much differentiation on academic performance among LL, PS11, PS33, PS130 and even PS198/PS111, and I think it’s a bit pointless to make such comparison and debating over. Outside of Citywide schools and LL, all other D2 G&T classes are part of a gen-ed school, so it still come down to whether you would like to send your kid to this school or not. Since PS6 to our family is not much different to PS33, with the benefit of G&T, we considered it worth the effort at that time. Also the fact there are quite a few families in UES sending kids to PS33 too help us affirm our decision, because those families could have stay local as well.

    Hope this helps with your coming decision. Good luck.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by pick12lotto View Post
    Hey, thanks for your reply!

    To your first point, I totally get that. There was quite a range. I guess we shouldn't be shocked as there are plenty of anecdotes/InsideSchools profiles out there, but when you really see it and hear it in person, it's striking. I find myself in the odd position of not feeling like there's a "best fit" per se, largely because PS6 seems like a very "complete" school. It's hard to knock it on any particular dimension... I think all I can say is it doesn't have G&T and the assumed benefits you note (e.g. high 'floors', having kids to 'chase', and perhaps some additional flexibility in the teaching approach that's more tailored to a G&T kid, though I think the latter is sort of another way of expressing the benefit of the "higher floor" assumption). I don't think the general "philosophical approach" is much different between PS6 and PS33, e.g. there is no "optional homework" but neither is at TAG levels of homework intensity in K either. There is a pretty decent chunk of PS6 kids hitting 4's in their ELAs and Math (I want to say somewhere between 60% and 80% depending on the subgroup and test in grade 4, but that's a rough recollection). It seems like PS33 G&T is more likely to be 4's for the vast majority of the kids. All of that is to say that this probably confirms the "higher floor" point, though as you noted given the very high percentage of kids at PS6 scoring 3 or 4's, query whether the PS6 "floor" is particularly concerning -- hard to say. One thing the PS6 principal said at their "Taste of Kindergarten" day was that this is not a sprint. I don't think she was saying take it easy or anything like that, but this kind of leads to the work product point, in my mind at least...

    To your second point, I'm very curious what/where stuck out to you in terms of student work. I feel like I tried to take this stuff in because everyone says look at the school work, but inevitably it was like fleeting glances at a few pieces here and there as tours marched on at a brisk pace. I was very impressed with the handwriting and coherent arguments made by the TAG K students about "why come to TAG." And some of the art I saw at TAG was unlike anything I'd seen elsewhere, and that impressed me too. If we had an offer to TAG, I'd have to seriously confront the question of whether that level of academic enrichment is worth the tradeoffs -- i.e. at TAG I think it is very much a "sprint." But in general, I was almost surprised in that I felt there wasn't a huge amount of variance in work product. It all seemed... fine, but not particularly mind-blowing. I saw a lot of "how to do X" stuff in the various G&T K programs, and they all seemed pretty similar to me. Maybe I was oblivious or just didn't look at the right stuff. I also paid more attention to lower grade work product and didn't see a ton of upper grade stuff, which might have been instructive as I suspect differentiation is probably easier to notice there. I'd love to hear your take on PS33 student work vs. what you saw in other programs. [If you'd rather PM any of this, that's fine with me.] I also have little recollection of PS6 work product. So I don't have a great basis for comparison there. But I know parents of smart kids at PS6 who seem very satisfied with the work their kids have done, at least in the earlier grades.

    Your reply also drives home that you're personally comparing G&Ts to a "non-superstar" gen-ed. It'd be an easier decision for us to give up a short commute if the zoned gen-ed wasn't as complete a package as PS6 (to your point about class sizes in this post, and about the value of a well-funded PTA in your earlier post, PS6 funds TAs in every classroom, which I think makes a real difference). Your earlier post was really diving into the benefits of PS6 (and other "superstar" gen-eds) and whether the potential benefits of a G&T are worth the trade offs. The challenge is the costs are pretty clear and the benefits are harder to be sure of. So we're still thinking it over, but I think the good news is that I'm pretty sure either path is probably pretty good.

    And yes, like you, the system wasn't like this where I grew up. We did have G&T, but if you tested in, where you went was still all driven by where you lived, and that was generally all there was to it.
    I went on a tour of TAG yesterday (choosing between there and a very good gened that's walking distance...) and I was reading those essays and they were 1. impressive and 2. so cute because of course their arguments to go to the school were snack time and prize box mainly, 5 year old priorities! Anyway - I feel your pain because I've also forgotten everything from my first tour of our local school, it's hard to compare things when you don't know what you're comparing until test scores come in and lottery results. Two good options still makes for a hard decision. Good luck!
    Last edited by Doxies; 06-15-2019 at 04:37 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts