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  1. #1

    Register your 'Aye' for bill to improve G&T and SHSAT/specialized high sch offerings

    Senate Bill S6510

    2019-2020 Legislative Session

    Relates to authorizing the chancellor of the city district to control and operate certain specialized high schools in the city of New York and to establish a commission on middle school achievement

    PURPOSE:

    Creates additional New York City specialized high schools;

    by the 2020-2021 academic year, guarantees the availability of free specialized high school admissions test tutoring services to all students;

    by the 2020-2021 academic year, requires eligible eighth grade public school students to take the specialized high school admissions test ("SHSAT") but with the ability to opt-out;

    by the 2020-2021 academic year, creates new Gifted and Talented programs for elementary and middle school students and requires eligible students to take the Gifted and Talented admissions exam;

    mandates the New York City Department of Education shall conduct additional outreach concerning specialized high schools and the specialized high school admissions test;

    and immediately establishes a commission to evaluate New York City's middle schools and offer recommendations for improvement.

    https://www.nysenate.gov/legislation...TnIfcD_vMkTZv8

  2. #2
    No! This bill is a trap, it doesn't do what your description says it will do. Don't fall for it!
    All the summary points you listed are fine things, but the key is right there in the title "***authorizing the chancellor of the city district to control and operate certain specialized high schools in the city of New York***". This bill is a "compromise" to give school superintendent Richard Carranza the power to eliminate testing for the specialized high schools as described here: https://chalkbeat.org/posts/ny/2019/...otest-outside/

    Do we seriously want Superintendent Carranza to have dictatorial powers to control the specialized schools and the gitfted and talented programs?
    * He has repeatedly stated he wants to eliminate testing for the specialized high schools and create a quota system from each high school. (See previous link) Your description says good things about providing availability for testing, but this bill gives him control to eliminate the test entirely, which he will do.
    * He is on record saying NYC already has "too many" gifted & talented students https://nypost.com/2019/02/21/richar...ify-as-gifted/ (and he made a math error on his numbers too)
    * While he was Superintendent of San Francisco, his plan for increasing diversity was to eliminate teaching algebra in middle school -- and any parent who disagreed was loudly called racist again and again (see http://sanfrancisco.granicus.com/pla...103?view_id=47 skip ahead to 1 hour 35 minutes in ). Now it's five years later and the percent of high school students in San Francisco passing Advanced Placement calculus has dropped by 13%.

    I fully support all the bullet points you listed above, and I'd support a law to do only those things. But not if means "authorizing" Superintendent Richard Carranza to "control and operate certain specialized high schools". We need the opposite!

    And beware of any bill that "establishes a commission to evaluate...and offer recommendations". We don't need to pass a law to ask for recommendations, we can do that already today. The stealth part of the bill is that 1) the school superintendent gets to hand-pick the members of his commision, and then 2) he gets to implement those recommendations with no further oversight from the state senate. IE, he gets full control.


    For anyone interested, here's the full text of the bill (not just a summary): https://legislation.nysenate.gov/pdf/bills/2019/S6510

  3. #3
    I agree. Although this alternate bill is a step in the right direction, it's just not there yet. I think many people are so relieved to even see it they're not giving it the thought it deserves. Both bills (this and the remove SHSAT one) are being left on the floor to just resume where they left off in January, which IMO is not a good thing for either of them.
    Passionate tutor of Elementary School subjects specializing in NY state tests, and the specialized high/middle school tests (SHSAT, Hunter, TACHS/CHSEE, BCA, MS 54, Anderson...)

  4. #4
    Well-spotted! I've been following the Carranza trajectory too and agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by heapchk View Post
    No! This bill is a trap, it doesn't do what your description says it will do. Don't fall for it!
    All the summary points you listed are fine things, but the key is right there in the title "***authorizing the chancellor of the city district to control and operate certain specialized high schools in the city of New York***". This bill is a "compromise" to give school superintendent Richard Carranza the power to eliminate testing for the specialized high schools as described here: https://chalkbeat.org/posts/ny/2019/...otest-outside/

    Do we seriously want Superintendent Carranza to have dictatorial powers to control the specialized schools and the gitfted and talented programs?
    * He has repeatedly stated he wants to eliminate testing for the specialized high schools and create a quota system from each high school. (See previous link) Your description says good things about providing availability for testing, but this bill gives him control to eliminate the test entirely, which he will do.
    * He is on record saying NYC already has "too many" gifted & talented students https://nypost.com/2019/02/21/richar...ify-as-gifted/ (and he made a math error on his numbers too)
    * While he was Superintendent of San Francisco, his plan for increasing diversity was to eliminate teaching algebra in middle school -- and any parent who disagreed was loudly called racist again and again (see http://sanfrancisco.granicus.com/pla...103?view_id=47 skip ahead to 1 hour 35 minutes in ). Now it's five years later and the percent of high school students in San Francisco passing Advanced Placement calculus has dropped by 13%.

    I fully support all the bullet points you listed above, and I'd support a law to do only those things. But not if means "authorizing" Superintendent Richard Carranza to "control and operate certain specialized high schools". We need the opposite!

    And beware of any bill that "establishes a commission to evaluate...and offer recommendations". We don't need to pass a law to ask for recommendations, we can do that already today. The stealth part of the bill is that 1) the school superintendent gets to hand-pick the members of his commision, and then 2) he gets to implement those recommendations with no further oversight from the state senate. IE, he gets full control.


    For anyone interested, here's the full text of the bill (not just a summary): https://legislation.nysenate.gov/pdf/bills/2019/S6510

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