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  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Asquare View Post
    I guess no one knows
    I think I can agree with some of the estimates being suggested but without precise data and the numbers being so tight it's a tough nut to crack with certainty.
    Passionate tutor of Elementary School subjects specializing in NY state tests, and the specialized high/middle school tests (SHSAT, Hunter, TACHS/CHSEE, ISEE, SSAT, ERB, ...)

  2. #42
    99+ mathematically means you need at least a 4.42 or 4.43 on either of the exams and then a decent score on the other. So that's not that many kids to begin with. Keep in mind some kids acing the math test, are not strong ELA students.

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by finewinescholar View Post
    99+ mathematically means you need at least a 4.42 or 4.43 on either of the exams and then a decent score on the other. So that's not that many kids to begin with. Keep in mind some kids acing the math test, are not strong ELA students.
    That is helpful. Is it possible to figure out the score overlap for both ELA/Math? For example, how many kids got say 4.2 in each? Im trying to figure out as best I can, how many kids are ahead of mine just on their average ELA/Math score?

    Second, it seems to me that if say Clinton did a lottery for perfect scores, it would have to do so for all applicants—otherwise a law suit. At the Clinton open house, the principal said they would fill for the high scores and then a lottery for those with the same scores under that number. I understood that to mean 100% would get seats and then the balance to anyone with a 3 in the wrong place on their school report. He also said about 70 seats, down from 92 last year, which would change the math somewhat.

  4. #44
    I thought Greg said they use Stanines? That would mean 96-100 would all be in the same lottery grouping.

  5. #45
    It's possible that they can still get distinction even if groupings are used in parts of the formula. I'd have to look again.

    I think too that any delta in the numbers we won't be able to calculate much further externally like this.
    Passionate tutor of Elementary School subjects specializing in NY state tests, and the specialized high/middle school tests (SHSAT, Hunter, TACHS/CHSEE, ISEE, SSAT, ERB, ...)

  6. #46
    So based on this analysis and the comments (thank you!) I don't think my son has a chance for LAB since he got a 3 on "respect rules" and 4 on everything else (4.42 Math and 4.26 ELA state tests). Since he has ADHD I don't know if a school like our zoned 75 Morton will be a good fit; he doesn't do well if not challenged...not sure what to do. We will look at private schools I guess although they are out of reach financially right now but hopefully our circumstances may change soon...

  7. #47
    Definitely apply to LAB... all my stuff on here is purely based on a guess of what felt reasonable, but I have NO extra information than anyone else on here.

    Personally speaking. I think 75 Morton and Baruch are very good schools and he would be challenged. All of the better (not just top) schools in D2 are excellent schools - just look compared to the rest of the state and the country - its shocking. We all need to realize that the average grades of these schools are very simply a function of the kids coming into the school, not what the school is doing. Good kids will continue to get high scores, bottom kids will continue to perform lower. Your very gifted son, will get a great education and do well there. Its simply the bottom kids that the zoned or less desirable screened school accept, which LAB does not accept, that drag down the overall scores. This is my personal belief after having visited the schools and spoken to students. We are all very fortunate. Private school is a waste of money in D2, but if you got it - spend it.

    Also - I would look very closely at Hudson River school. I think a lot of the kids there are the top Math students, that might not have done as well on the ELA (gotten 3). You can see on the DOE sites where they break things down by ethnicity. A lot of Asian boys have 4 on math and drop off on the ELA. I think many of them end up going to Hudson. I have not looked at the rubric for Hudson that closely.

  8. #48
    Just wanted to follow up. My son didn’t get into LAB or Salk. He will go to the 75 Morton which is our zoned school. The most important grade is “respect school rules” which carries the heaviest weight and unfortunately a 3 disqualifies you... we have 100 ahead of us on the weight lists

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